Adrenaline rush in Canada, overall individual winner from National Guard

 

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Sgt. 1st Class Joshua Holmes with the Maine Army National Guard jumps down the obstacle before entering a corridor to take out enemy targets during the 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration (CAFSAC) held at the Connaught Ranges, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada September 2018. (Photo by Army Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

~ Missouri Army National Guard Soldier wins at 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration

 

ROBINSON MANEUVER TRAINING CENTER, North Little Rock, Arkansas – Adrenaline pumping, a Soldier stands behind a black wall, anxiously waiting to begin an assault into the unknown while trying not to be killed. Once inside there is no turning back.

The Soldier goes numb, shutting off all feelings, becoming highly aware, intensely focused on the mission ahead; kill all the enemy, save all the hostages, and find the code to defuse the bomb inside. Hoping that all the training up to this point has been good enough, thoughts fill the Soldier’s mind. “How many enemy targets are in there? how many hostages? where is the code? can I make it in time?”

The Soldier is ready and focused on the mission. Rushing in, pistol drawn and cocked, the Soldier sees someone. “Shoot!” thought the Soldier, “two in the chest; one in the head.” And the enemy is down. “Where is the code?”

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Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Catlin with the Colorado Army National Guard kicks in a door before taking out enemy targets that are on the other side during the 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration (CAFSAC) held at the Connaught Ranges, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada September 2018. (Photo by Army Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

The Soldier swiftly moves down the hall and sees another. “Two in the chest; one in the head. Got him. There’s a door,” thought the Soldier.

 

A rush of adrenaline surges, as the Soldier sees a door. Quickly approaching, the Soldier kicks it in. “Shoot or don’t shoot?” the Soldier instantly thought. The enemy falls. “Where is the code?”

The Soldier continues on, moving swiftly, through the labyrinth of doors, corridors and corners facing the same dilemma time and again thinking, “Enemy, hostage, shoot; don’t shoot; where is the code?”

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Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Catlin with the Colorado Army National Guard runs around a corner as he looks for enemy targets and the code to a “bomb” that he must disable along the way, which is all part of a scenario to test his skills of accuracy and speed under pressure during one of the matches at the 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration (CAFSAC) held at the Connaught Ranges, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada September 2018. (Photo by Army Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

Turning the corner there are two. “Two in the chest; one in the head.” and

 

Hostage saved, enemy dead, but “where is the code?

A look of panic crosses the Soldier’s face. Second-guessing, “Oh no, did I miss something?” The Soldier turns to survey the area, thinking, “is there an enemy target I may have missed through that window?” Thankfully no, and the Soldier quickly refocuses back on the mission and moves forward and takes out a few more enemy targets.

Kicking in yet another door the Soldier pauses slightly. This time is different. There’s blood. Written in blood on the hostage’s head is the code 731, and in a split-second:  “POW-POW…POW.”

The enemy captor is dead and the hostage was saved. “731.”

Now that the code was found the Soldier pressed forward even faster running down the corridor, taking out enemy targets through windows and around corners, saving more hostages, and then dives under a fallen wall. “What if the enemy is through there? I hope I don’t get shot. 731.”

Moving through the tunnel, on the other side appears a door and someone in a nearby window. “Two in the chest; one in the head. 731.” Another enemy down. The Soldier kicks open the door.

“Shoo,” the Soldier let out a sigh of relief. There is the bomb; “Just in time.”

Reminiscent of combat environments, this was just one of over 20 different operational “combat style” shooting matches conducted at the 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration (CAFSAC) held September 2018 at the Connaught Ranges in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

During CAFSAC, the National Guard All Guard International Combat Team displayed the expert marksmanship skills of the National Guard by winning several awards, but most notably was Staff Sgt. David Ball, who won the Combined Arms Overall Individual Category.

180921-z-bf582-1201-1Representing the U.S. National Guard All Guard International Combat Team were 12 members and two team managers who included:

Capt. Adam Moore, team OIC, Arkansas National Guard
Master Sgt. Greg Neiderhiser, team NCOIC, Pennsylvania National Guard
Maj. Kirk Freeman, team member, Arkansas National Guard
Maj. Glen Jackson, team member, Tennessee National Guard
1stLt. Garrett Miller, team member, Pennsylvania National Guard
Sgt. 1stClass Christopher Catlin, team member, Colorado National Guard
Sgt. 1stClass Paul Deugan, team member, Iowa National Guard
Sgt. 1stClass David Keenom, team member, Tennessee National Guard
Sgt. 1stClass Justin Holmes, team member, Maine National Guard
Sgt. David Ball, team member, Missouri National Guard
Sgt. Maxim Nickerson, team member, Maine National Guard
Spc. Jeremy McCombs, team member, Colorado National Guard

In addition to Sgt. Ball winning Combined Arms Overall Individual, there were several other wins by the team and individual members:

Top four in Service Pistol (Colt Canada Trophy) – Ball and McCombs
Top four in Service Rifle (Colt Canada Trophy) – Freeman and Miller
Pursuit to Mons – Freeman
Military Biathlon – Team (Ball, Freeman, McCombs and Nickerson)
Falaise Pocket – Jackson
Ortona – Freeman
Top four member Service Pistol Team (The Allard Trophy) – Team (Ball, Catlin, Freeman and Miller)
Top Falling Plates Team (The Fire Team Trophy) – Holmes, Jackson, McCombs and Nickerson

To find out more about how to participate contact the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center at 501-212-4420/4517/4520 or visit us on Facebook.

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Brass is flying as Maj. Kirk Freeman with the Arkansas Army National Gaurd clears the building as part of a scenario to test his skills of accuracy and speed under pressure during one of the matches at the 2018 Canadian Armed Forces Skill at Arms Concentration (CAFSAC) held at the Connaught Ranges, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada September 2018. (Photo by Army Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)
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2019 WPW: You play, America wins

LOI Tracker Map (19FEB2019)
by Theresa Austin, Maj. public affairs officer, National Guard Marksmanship Training Center

ROBINSON MANEUVER TRAINING CENTER, Arkansas – The Winston P. Wilson National Rifle and Pistol Championship at the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center is set to begin in April 2019. 17 more states have already submitted their letters of intent (LOI), as of February 19, 2019, bringing the total to 24, but the goal is to have all 50 states and territories participate.

This competition is fun, but ultimately it is about training America’s military to become better marksmen. When America’s military are better marksmen, this increases lethality, and that is how we are going to win America’s wars. Every marksmanship competition is an opportunity to hone in on accuracy and effectiveness which increases lethality. The added bonus is that during this event competitors will always learn from other participants, who are performing on various levels from novice to professional and who have different experiences. The knowledge that is shared between the competitors will return to their home states and fellow service members.

The NGMTC is tracking confirmations to attend on this map. Be proactive with your marksmanship program and help NGMTC achieve the goal of 100% participation across all 50 states and territories. Contact your state marksmanship training coordinator (SMC) or marksmanship regional coordinator (MAC) to get involved.

Click here for more information on 2019 WPW Sniper, Machine gun, and Rifle & Pistol, as well as AFSAM and CNGB.

National Guard Marksmanship Teams add six new President’s 100 Tab recipients to the ranks of elite marksmen

~Six new President’s 100 Tab and three new Distinguished Badge recipients
by Maj. Theresa Austin, National Guard Marksmanship Training Center

Six members of the National Guard All Guard Team earned the rare President’s 100 Tab for the first time during the 2018 Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) National Matches held at Camp Perry, Ohio July 1-August 8, 2018.

The Tab is awarded to the top scoring 100 rifle and 100 pistol shooters who compete in the President’s 100 match each year at the CMP and when earned by military personnel, the President’s 100 Tab may be worn on the uniform of several branches of service. The National Guard had 16 recipients this year.

“President’s 100 tab is one of those things that not very many people earn. It signifies that you are at the top of that category as the go to person for marksmanship in a profession where marksmanship is everything,” said Spc. Andrew Traciak, National Guard All Guard Service Rifle Team member from Washington Army National Guard.

Spc. Traciak earned his President’s 100 Rifle tab for the first time this year during the CMP and there were, also, five others who earned the President’s 100 Tab for the first time.

The President’s 100 Rifle Tab:
– Staff Sgt. Joseph Berendzen, South Carolina Army National Guard
– Master Sgt Donnie Hicks, Texas Air National Guard

The President’s 100 Pistol Tab:
– Cadet Lisa Emmert, Michigan Army National Guard
– Sgt. Brian Bleuer, Iowa Army National Guard
– Sgt. 1st Class Seth Innes, Florida Army National Guard

All Guard Service Rifle Team at 2018 Civilian Marksmanship Progam National Matches
The All Guard Service Rifle Team members who earned the President’s 100 Rifle Tab during the Civilian Marksmanship Program National Matches July 23 – Aug. 5, 2018 at Camp Perry, Ohio. (Left to Right: 1st time recipient Staff Sgt. Joseph Berendzen, South Carolina Army National Guard; 1st time recipient Spc. Andrew Traciak, Washington Army National Guard; multiple recipient Staff Sgt. John Coggshall, Connecticut Army National Guard; 1st time recipient Master Sgt Donnie Hicks, Texas Air National Guard; multiple recipient Master Sgt. Greg Neiderhiser, Pennsylvania Army National Guard; multiple recipient Master Sgt. Mike Hester, Arkansas Army National Guard; not depicted 1st time recipient Sgt. John Paul Cholak, Texas Army National Guard) (photo by Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

Several team members continued to demonstrate outstanding performance as multiple recipients of the President’s 100 Tab.

The President’s 100 Rifle Tab:
– Master Sgt. Mike Hester, Arkansas Army National Guard
– Sgt. 1st Class John Paul Cholak, Texas Army National Guard
– Staff Sgt. John Coggshall, Connecticut Army National Guard
– Master Sgt. Greg Neiderhiser, Pennsylvania Army National Guard

The President’s 100 Pistol Tab:
– Master Sgt. Morgan Jenkins, Wyoming Army National Guard
– Sgt. 1stClass Eric Lawerence, South Carolina Army National Guard
– Sgt. Nestor Pena, Puerto Rico Army National Guard
– Spc. Carl Trompeter, New York Army National Guard
– Capt. Travis Whalmeir, Nebraska Army National Guard
– Master Sgt. Travis Zwickle, Nebraka Army National Guard

The President’s 100 wasn’t the only prestigious award won this year.

Technical Sgt. Eric Rueth with the Wisconsin Air National Guard and Master Sgt. Hester earned their Distinguished Rifleman Badge and Cadet Emmert earned her Distinguished Pistol Badge.

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Cadet Lisa Emmert, All Guard Service Pistol Team member with the Michigan Army National Guard, earned her Distinguished Pistol Badge this year. (photo by Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

The President’s 100 Tab and the Distinguished Rifle and Pistol Badges are not often earned by military personnel and seen worn on the uniform, but when recognized, these awards identify them as being among the most elite marksmen in their service.”

Traciak may only be a specialist in the National Guard, but he is now officially one of the nations elite marksmen, and he has altruistic goals for his new proclaimed status as well as a vision for his State’s marksmanship program to “change the culture back towards focusing on marksmanship as a core competency to increase the lethality across the force as a whole.”

All Guard Service Rifle Team at 2018 Civilian Marksmanship Progam National Matches
Spc. Andrew Traciak, All Guard Service Rifle Team member from Washington Army National Guard, is presented his President’s 100 by Col. J.R. Treharne at the Civilian Marksmanship Program National Matches held at Camp Perry, Ohio on Aug. 2, 2018. (photo by Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

“My goal this year was making the President’s 100, and with that my primary goal was to be able to take this back to my State and talk to State leadership about helping other individuals get to this level,” said Traciak.

The Washington Army National Guard is currently rebuilding its marksmanship program, and Spc. Traciak hopes to influence the program to make their Soldiers more lethal on the battlefield.

“My state is trying to build a marksmanship program right now, and I’m trying to come in and assist the State with getting that program up and running,” he said. “I can take this back to my State, in a coaching position for a State training team or State marksmanship team and continue developing more coaches and shooters that could be utilized across the State to build force readiness amongst all of our other units.”

All Guard Service Rifle Team at 2018 Civilian Marksmanship Progam National Matches
Spc. Andrew Traciak, All Guard Service Rifle Team member from Washington Army National Guard, adjusts his windage knob after stage one of the National Infantry Team Match during the Civilian Marksmanship Program National Matches July 23-Aug. 5, 2018. (photo by Maj. Theresa Austin/Released) 

Staff Sgt. John Coggshall, a President’s Rifle Tab repeat recipient from Connecticut Army National Guard, explained what it is like being at the highest level of competition on the All Guard Service Rifle Team.

All Guard Service Rifle Team at 2018 Civilian Marksmanship Progam National Matches
Staff Sgt. John Coggshall, All Guard Service Rifle Team member from Connecticut Army National Guard, takes aim during the Civilian Marksmanship Program National Matches held at Camp Perry, Ohio July 23-Aug. 5, 2018. (photo by Maj. Theresa Austin/Released)

“When you get to our level, your gains in level of ability are minimal, but we still practice and gain more knowledge of troubleshooting and analyzing other peoples problems. It’s not as much about my skills; it’s making me a better teacher and instructor of others faster and more efficiently,” said Staff Sgt. Coggshall

Through the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center, the primary goal of the competitive events program and the All Guard Shooting Teams is to develop subject matter experts who take the advanced marksmanship training knowledge gained through competitions back to their regions and states to train, mentor and coach others to improve their marksmanship skills. Through this method the National Guard can more efficiently and effectively train the most Soldiers to increase force readiness.

Spc. Traciak summed it up saying, “We’re not exactly the Peace Corps. Our job is to go out, put rounds on target, and increase the lethality of the force.”

 

WPW: You play, America wins

NGMTC WPW Participation 2018
by Kathrine Grandori, Sgt. National Guard Marksmanship Training Center

ROBINSON MANEUVER TRAINING CENTER, Ark. – The Winston P. Wilson National Championships at the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center will begin in April 2018. Several states have already submitted their letters of intent (LOI), as of March 3, 2018, and the goal is to have all 50 states and territories participate.

Many may think that this competition is only valuable as a “play to win,” but when it comes to marksmanship in the National Guard, we must “train to win.” Every competition is an opportunity to increase readiness and learn new skills. Marksmen always learn from other participants and improve their skills. That knowledge will return to their home states and fellow service members.

The NGMTC will be tracking confirmations to attend on this map. Be proactive with your marksmanship program and help NGMTC achieve the goal of participation across all 50 states and territories in 2018. Contact your state marksmanship training coordinator (SMC) or marksmanship regional coordinator (MAC) to get involved.

Click here for more information on 2018 WPW Sniper, Machine gun, and small arms, as well as AFSAM and CNGB.